a deer, a new flower, and a hawkmoth

We put out a new salt block and it didn’t take the deer long to find it. They LOVE it! I happened to see this doe from the kitchen window while fixing dinner.

What a sweet face – She’s studying me while I’m studying her!

I check for new wildflowers in the fields everyday and just recently noticed this strange-looking one. I’ve never seen it before and have no idea what it is. I’ll research it when I get a chance, but if anyone knows what it is, please speak up.

This is a hawkmoth enjoying the wild bergamot that is very prolific right now. Hawkmoths are commonly mistaken for hummingbirds – they even hover over the flower while they suck up nectar through their long tongues. Some insert their forelegs first, to “taste” the flower with their feet. Like the hummingbird, hawkmoths can hover and fly frontwards and backwards.

I love it that I never know what I’m going to see from one day to the next. Nature is ever-changing and brings joy to anyone who takes the time to look.

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4 thoughts on “a deer, a new flower, and a hawkmoth

  1. JoAnn, that is so true…I have found much joy from my porch view of the constantly changing vista of our wildflowers, and our bird population! Periodically there is a surprise visit from the wild turkeys, guinna (sp?) hens, and deer!!! It’s magical!!!!!!! Love,Margie

  2. Talk about surprise visits, we had a hummingbird fly into the house last night! She flew in through an open door and went up to the front window which has a vaulted ceiling, and there was no way we could reach her. About two hours later, she flew down into our bedroom and Bill was able to catch her in a towel. We released her and she flew into the rafters of the porch where I guess she spent the night, and by morning, she was gone. We have a new rule – all doors remain closed until the hummers are gone!

    • I believe you’re right, Tracy. Virginia is in the southern end of its range. Interesting how the flower got its name from the rattlesnake master borer beetle. Thanks for identifying it!

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